No one should give alcohol to those under 18. Not drinking alcohol is the safest option for children and young people under 18.

Research shows that 71% of parents/carers/guardians in the ACT do not provide alcohol to under 18s in their care.

Source Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol and Drug Survey 2017

 

There are benefits to delaying alcohol use for under 18s.

Research shows that giving teens alcohol may in fact be more harmful. The earlier a person starts drinking alcohol the greater the risk of changing the development of the brain.

Children whose parents gave them alcohol in early adolescence were three times more likely to be drinking full serves of alcohol by the time they were 16 years old than children in families who did not supply alcohol.

This can lead to problems with memory and learning and other harms as well as increases the risk of having alcohol-related problems later in life.

Fewer teenagers are choosing to drink alcohol. However when surveyed, many teenagers that drank alcohol in the last week were drinking at harmful levels.

This can increase the risk of accident, injury and antisocial behaviour.

The prevalence of risk-taking behaviours increases in adolescence and the likelihood of injury increases further still when alcohol is also involved.

 

You can learn about the effects of alcohol and the support services available in the ACT at Impact Alcohol http://www.impactalcohol.org.au/.

Did you know?

In the ACT it is illegal to supply alcohol to under 18’s in a private setting without parental or guardian permission.  Learn more about the law on supplying alcohol to minors at

 https://www.justice.act.gov.au/safer-communities-gaming-and-racing-policy/liquor-policy/secondary-supply-alcohol-minors

These campaign materials are based on the ‘I need you to say no’ campaign developed in Western Australia that was informed by the National Health and Medical Research Council Guidelines.

 This campaign is part of the Government's election commitment to run a responsible consumption of alcohol campaign funded through liquor licence fees.